How Companies Use Cloud-Based Model Coordination to Reduce Rework

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Research has shown that cloud-based construction technology is the key to reducing rework.

Maybe you remember the days when, limited by technology, digital designs and project models resided on individual desktop computers or servers. Back then, sharing models with anyone outside the office was especially challenging. BIM (building information modeling) and VDC (virtual design and construction) managers were responsible for checking out every clash, big or small, during coordination meetings. The manual process was time consuming for everyone.

BIM coordination; image: Autodesk.com.au

Considering new consumer demands around sustainability and safety, as well as rapid changes in innovation, labor shortages, and supply chain issues, construction projects are becoming more complex every day. Streamlined workflows are key to keeping projects within tighter schedules and budgets. Cloud-based solutions, like the Unified Platform from Autodesk, are an important and necessary component for making this happen.


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Access to real-time data through a cloud-based project gives teams the ability to make better informed decisions on a project. In a McGraw Hill SmartMarket report “The Business Value of BIM in North America,” about three-quarters of contractors using cloud-based tools reported better collaboration; two-thirds reported improved productivity.

Model coordination in the preconstruction workflow ensures that the design intent can actually be constructed. It includes aligning multiple disciplines to coordinate a construction project so schedule and cost overruns can be avoided. According to the “6th Annual JBKnowledge Construction Technology Report,” over half of general contractors believe model coordination is one of the most important benefits of using a BIM process in the project workflow.

Rework on the typical construction project can account for 20% or more of the total cost of completion – cutting into profits. But focusing on continuous improvement can help reduce rework, as described in “A Guide to Construction Rework Reduction,” by the Construction Industry Institute. The guide lists the steps as: tracking and evaluating rework and the reason(s) behind it; making a plan for corrective action; integrating changes into the project management system.

According to a JBKnowledge Construction Technology Survey report, fewer than 25% of companies use project management software to collect information from the jobsite, even though data collection on construction projects is critical.

As explained in the FMI Construction Disconnected Report “The High Cost of Poor Data and Miscommunication,” thanks to mobile devices, apps and software on construction jobsites, the industry is “ripe for digitization” that could improve productivity. The report explains ways technology can reduce the miscommunication caused by poor project data that accounts for up to half of rework on projects.

When the jobsite and office are connected through cloud-based software tools, companies see a significant return on investment. An example, citing Skanska, was shared by Autodesk Digital Builder in August 2022. The report explained that cloud-based construction technology can help workers avoid mistakes on the jobsite, so they can focus on moving the project forward rather than fixing mistakes.


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